KillithFair

I'm into Harry Potter, queer black feminism, post-post alt music, and fashion blogs.
gradientlair:

nuneyskid:

50-year anniversary of the 9/15/1963 murder of four African-American girls in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Their names are Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robinson, Addie Mae Collins and Denise McNair.

gradientlair:

nuneyskid:

50-year anniversary of the 9/15/1963 murder of four African-American girls in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Their names are Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robinson, Addie Mae Collins and Denise McNair.

(via ethiopienne)

tj:

Astoundingly awful story of “every day” sexism and racism from @iSmashFizzle.

If you can’t read it here, see this timeline that I put together.

(Thanks to Matt for explaining how Twitter’s timeline feature wörks.)

(via angrywocunited)

in3ffable-lib3rty:

black—lamb:

cute-pubes:

As I was sitting in the back of the police car, I remembered the countless times my father came home frustrated or humiliated by the cops when he had done nothing wrong. I felt his shame, his anger, and my own feelings of frustration for existing in a world where I have allowed myself to believe that “authority figures” could control my BEING… my ability to BE!
Danièle’s husband, Brian Lucas, who is white, says he believes they were targeted because they are an interracial couple.
Read more here

black privilege….

they literally saw a black woman kissing a white man and ASSUMED SHE WAS A PROSTITUTE. and then they said they were married AND THE COPS FUCKING ASKED FOR ID???? what the fuck? what the fuck? and she said no AND WAS ARRESTED? they need to be fired but God knows that’s not going to happen. LISTEN: she’s an actress. this happened to a producer. even fucking Oprah. no matter what you accomplish as a black person, you are still black and people don’t think their rights apply to you despite the constitution it’s really scaryit’s really infuriatingit’s really exhausting

in3ffable-lib3rty:

black—lamb:

cute-pubes:

As I was sitting in the back of the police car, I remembered the countless times my father came home frustrated or humiliated by the cops when he had done nothing wrong. I felt his shame, his anger, and my own feelings of frustration for existing in a world where I have allowed myself to believe that “authority figures” could control my BEING… my ability to BE!

Danièle’s husband, Brian Lucas, who is white, says he believes they were targeted because they are an interracial couple.

Read more here

black privilege….

they literally saw a black woman kissing a white man and ASSUMED SHE WAS A PROSTITUTE. and then they said they were married AND THE COPS FUCKING ASKED FOR ID???? what the fuck? what the fuck? and she said no AND WAS ARRESTED? they need to be fired but God knows that’s not going to happen. LISTEN: she’s an actress. this happened to a producer. even fucking Oprah. no matter what you accomplish as a black person, you are still black and people don’t think their rights apply to you despite the constitution
it’s really scary
it’s really infuriating
it’s really exhausting

(via raveniselswhere)

pan-tastic:

asieyonce:

The Queen of Rap slaying with Queen Bey. ***Flawless

!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Bey is just so INTO Nicki’s verse she is just FEELING it and I love it so much <3

(Source: arrtpop, via vivanlosancestros)

kenyan4life:

blackboybe:

(video)

Genocide is defined by the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide as “any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such: killing members of the group; causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group; deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group; [and] forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.” 

This is brilliant and I’m here for it #wechargegenocide

(via vivanlosancestros)

magnacarterholygrail:

I decided I needed breakup songs for us and by us that won’t leave me all depressed, and after I made the playlist, I thought it would be a good idea to make it into a mixtape and share it. So, I present to you, “DON’T LET THE DOOR HIT YOU: Twenty Songs about Getting Over and Getting Him The Fuck Out by Women of Color”

Track list:

1. EXHALE (SHOOP SHOOP) - WHITNEY HOUSTON
2. BEST THING I NEVER HAD - BEYONCE
3. GOOD LUCK - LISA KEKAULA & BASEMENT JAXX
4. U GOT NERVE - AALIYAH
5. 3 STRIKES - KELLY PRICE
6. SURVIVOR - DESTINY’S CHILD
7. MY JOY - LEELA JAMES
8. FORGET - LIANNA LA HAVAS
9. SOMEBODY COME GET ME (ILLADELPHONICS LIVE REMIX) - MELANIE FIONA
10. IRREPLACEABLE - BEYONCE
11. SATURDAY NIGHT - NOISETTES
12. BREAKIN’ DISHES - RIHANNA
13. KARMA - ALICIA KEYS
14. GUINNESSES - ANGELIKA, 4IZE, AND MF DOOM
15. HIT ‘EM UP STYLE (OOPS!) - BLU CANTRELL
16. NO SCRUBS - TLC
17. GONNA BE FINE - MONICA
18. SHAKE IT OFF - MARIAH CAREY
19. ME, MYSELF & I - BEYONCE
20. YOU GOTTA BE - DES’REE

Hope you enjoy it!

LINK | (if it doesn’t work, send me a message and I’ll reupload it with no problem!) 

I love breakup songs even when I’m dating someone LOL.

(via ethiopienne)

I know that Black creativity has saved your life many times before. I know, because I’ve seen it happen. I’ve listened as non-Black people in my communities raised on Hip Hop talked about how it was the only relatable, empowering culture they found that also educated and radicalized them as a youth. It was formational. I’ve watched people become politicized, shaping their new political identities after bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Assata Shakur, Angela Davis and Frantz Fanon. I’ve watched as folks become activist celebrities using radical ideas from Black Power and Civil Rights movements to shape programs that do not benefit Black people. I’ve watched as people make livings and loads of social capital off of DJing Black music, dancing, walking and dressing like Black people, selling the Black aesthetic to others. I’ve heard that friends use Nina Simone and Sade to sing them back from depression, Rihanna and D’Angelo to get them in the mood. So many people in my communities, lately, have been using Octavia Butler to renew their hope for radical futures. Without Black people, what would your lives be? You might be thinking, you know, it’s so much more complicated than all this, race is complex, we’re all part of the human family, etc., etc…

Black art is not free for all damaged souls. When Nina sang about strange fruit, she was talking about a lynching…of Black people. When Black rappers say Fuck the Police, they speak to a state system of lynching…Black people. Your pain and isolation, however real it may be, is not the same as being Black. Your self-adoption into hip hop and djembe drumming and spoken word, makes our art forms all about you. You, however well meaning, have stolen Black labour and invention and used it for your own purpose. It warps the medium and changes the message, the magic, the healing. From now on, consider how the cost of consuming, appropriating, regurgitating, and getting your life in multiple ways from Black art, Black culture, and Black peoples’ creative genius detrimentally impacts our lives. Being Black in an anti-black world means experiencing daily attacks that threaten our dignity, our happiness, our freedom, and often our lives; and in order to enjoy Black culture, you’re going to have to take action to help get these back.

But because Black people’s labour, language, intelligence, creativity, and survival arts have always been considered free for the taking, you probably didn’t feel ways about using it. You probably didn’t think twice. Black culture is the most pilfered, the most ‘borrowed,’ the most thieved culture, and we’ve seen this happen time and tie again.

Nadijah Robinson

Quote is from her essay Black Art Is Not A Free For All on Black Girl Dangerous. Read it all. Truly exquisite writing, especially as non-Black people continue to use, consume, pilfer, plagiarize and be appropriative of Black cultural production and art while simultaneously suggesting that Black culture, especially that Black American culture, does not exist. 

I’ve also watched non-Black people suggest Black people contribute “nothing” to anti-oppression theory or praxis while their ENTIRE FRAMEWORK for approaching it is via Black cultural production or Black women’s epistemology.

Like…the cognitive dissonance proffered via perspectives shaped by anti-Blackness is astounding.

(via gradientlair)

“Being Black in an anti-black world means experiencing daily attacks that threaten our dignity, our happiness, our freedom, and often our lives”
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“Being Black in an anti-black world…”
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Nadijah, thank you for writing this and articulating this PRECISELY! I was reading this with my hand over my heart, nodding at every sentence and relishing the way these words spoke out loud feelings and struggles I live with, that are often hard to express. Especially to other non-black poc. So I’m reading and loving every word and get to the end and see your name (!!!) and feel so lucky to know you and that we get to share the same air. Congrats on having your excellence documented and shared!

(via patchworkpoetics)

(via grumpyfemme)

chescaleigh:

Amen. Wearing a weave, wig or relaxer does not mean you have low self esteem or self hatred issues, the same way wearing your natural hair texture does not mean you’re automatically self confident or love yourself more than someone else does.

chescaleigh:

Amen. Wearing a weave, wig or relaxer does not mean you have low self esteem or self hatred issues, the same way wearing your natural hair texture does not mean you’re automatically self confident or love yourself more than someone else does.

(Source: blackwomenconfessions)